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locality:- High Peel Near
locality:- Peel Ness
parish Colton parish, once in Lancashire
county:- Cumbria
viewpoint; station
coordinates:- SD2991
10Km square:- SD29

1Km square SD2991

old map:- Crosthwaite 1783-94 (Con)

Series of maps, An Accurate Map of the Matchless Lake of Derwent, of the Grand Lake of Windermere, of the Beautiful Lake of Ullswater, of Broadwater or Bassenthwaite Lake, of Coniston Lake, of Buttermere, Crummock and Loweswater Lakes, and Pocklington's Island, by Peter Crosthwaite, Kendal, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1783 to 1794.
thumbnail CTESD29V, button to large image
West's 2d. Station
square symbol
date:- 1783=1794
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s; 1790s

old map:- Crosthwaite 1783-94 (Con)

Series of maps, An Accurate Map of the Matchless Lake of Derwent, of the Grand Lake of Windermere, of the Beautiful Lake of Ullswater, of Broadwater or Bassenthwaite Lake, of Coniston Lake, of Buttermere, Crummock and Loweswater Lakes, and Pocklington's Island, by Peter Crosthwaite, Kendal, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1783 to 1794.
West's 2d. Station
level with Peel Island.

other name:- station, Coniston, West 2
coordinates:- SD29849187
date:- 1788
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

descriptive text:- West 1778 (11th edn 1821)

Guide book, A Guide to the Lakes, by Thomas West, published by William Pennington, Kendal, Cumbria once Westmorland, and in London, 1778 to 1821.
image WS21P049, button   goto source.
Page 49:-
STATION II. When you are opposite to the peninsula last described proceed through a gate on the left hand, and from the rocky eminence you have a general view of the lake, both ways. To the south, a sweet bay is formed between the horns of two peninsulas, and beyond that a fine sheet of water appears, terminated by the promontories which form the straits, through which the lake has its outlet. From thence the coast is beautifully diversified by a number of green eminences crowned with wood, and sequestered cottages interspersed among them half concealed by yew trees; and, above them, a wave of rocky, spiral mountains, dressed in brown vegetation, form the most romantic scenes. Between this and a wooded eminence, a green hill, cut into inclosures to
image WS21P050, button   goto source.
Page 50:-
the very top, in some parts patched with rock and little groves, has a beautiful appearance; especially when contrasted with the barren scenes on one hand, and the deep shade of a waving wood on the other. At the foot of this cultivated tract, and on the margin of the lake, a few white houses, partly concealed by a grove, look like enchanted seats on a fairy ground. Behind these a barren bleak mountain frowns in sullen majesty, and down his furrowed side the Black-beck of Torver rolls its fretted torrent. Just at your feet lies the oblong rocky isle of Peel; and near it the dark points of half-immersed rocks just show themselves by turns. Here is the finest picture of the lake, and when it is smooth the whole is seen reflected on the shining surface of the watery mirror. On the western side the coast is steep rocks. The eastern side is much embayed. The high end of the lake is here in view, yet it seems to wind both ways behind the opposite promontories. The range of naked rocks that cross the head of the lake appear now awful, from their sable hue, and behind them, the immense mass of Cove, Rydal-head, and many nameless mountains, have a most stupendous appearance, and seeming inaccessible height. A succession of pretty bays open to the traveller as he advances; the banks become more wooded,
image WS21P051, button   goto source.
Page 51:-
and more cultivation appears. On the western margin stands the lady of the lake, Coniston-hall, concealed in a grove of tall trees, and above it, the village of the same name. The hall has only changed masters twice since the conquest, and has belonged to the family of Fleming most of time.

other name:- station, Coniston, West 2
date:- 1778
period:- 18th century, late; 1770s

photographs
The viewpoint on the highest point of Peel Ness, High Peel Near, has gone; tree planting has grown up, and all you see is glimpses of a panorama between the branches, it won't be much better in winter with the leaves gone. Tree planting as conservation might be a good thing, but are you conserving the landscape or the tourists' appreciation of it?
The first four panoramas are taken from Peel Ness: from the shore at the north end, from the shore part way down, and from two points at the south end, one on a rocky eminence the other from the shore. The pictures are taken to enable comparison with watercolour paintings by Stephen Penn, 1732 and 1733, which clearly allow a great a deal of artistic licence. His viewpoint is up in the air; and his directions in his titles are just plain wrong.
tiny photograph, 
button to large station, Peel Ness -- High Peel Near -- Peel Ness -- Colton -- Cumbria / -- From north shore of Peel Ness, -- SD29599181 (W to N) -- 13.8.2010
tiny photograph, 
button to large station, Peel Ness -- High Peel Near -- Peel Ness -- Colton -- Cumbria / -- From west shore of Peel Ness, -- SD29519172 (W to N) -- 13.8.2010
tiny photograph, 
button to large station, Peel Ness -- High Peel Near -- Peel Ness -- Colton -- Cumbria / -- From a rocky eminence, south end of Peel Ness, -- SD29499168 (S to N) -- 13.8.2010
tiny photograph, 
button to large station, Peel Ness -- High Peel Near -- Peel Ness -- Colton -- Cumbria / -- From the shore below the rocky eminence, south end of Peel Ness, -- SD29499168 (S to N) -- 13.8.2010

photographs
Two panoramas were taken from further north on the lake shore. These might help resolve what Stephen Penn could have seen in his SW view.
tiny photograph, 
button to large station, Peel Ness -- High Peel Near -- Peel Ness -- Colton -- Cumbria / -- SD29849207 (N of W) -- 13.8.2010
tiny photograph, 
button to large station, Peel Ness -- High Peel Near -- Peel Ness -- Colton -- Cumbria / -- SD29849207 (N of W) -- 13.8.2010

Old Cumbria Gazetteer - JandMN: 2013

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