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placename:- Belle Isle
other name:- Longholm
other name:- Long Holme
other name:- Holme, The
other name:- Holme House
site name:- Windermere lake
parish Windermere parish, once in Westmorland
county:- Cumbria
island; building/s
coordinates:- SD393967
10Km square:- SD39
The island and house are treated as one.

1Km square SD3996

photograph

Belle Isle -- Windermere lake -- Windermere -- Cumbria / -- 15.2.2008
photograph

Belle Isle -- Windermere lake -- Windermere -- Cumbria / -- Jetty. -- 12.5.2008

old map:- OS County Series (Wmd 32 11)

County Series maps of Great Britain, scales 6 and 25 inches to 1 mile, published by the Ordnance Survey, Southampton, Hampshire, from about 1863 to 1948.

placename:- Belle Isle
island
date:- 1890=1899
period:- 19th century, late; 1890s

source:- Philip/Wilson 1890s

thumbnail PHW1E001, button to large image
BOWNESS, FROM BELLE ISLE.
date:- 1895
period:- 19th century, late; 1890s

old photograph:- Bell 1880s-1940s

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Photograph, black and white, Belle Isle, Windermere lake, Windermere, Westmorland, by Herbert Bell, photographer, Ambleside, Westmorland, 1890s.
internegative at lower left:-
H. Bell
date:- 1890=1899
period:- 19th century, late

old photograph:- Bell 1880s-1940s

thumbnail HB0265, button to large image
Photograph, b/w, Belle Isle from Furness Fell, Windermere lake, Westmorland, by Herbert Bell, Ambleside, Westmorland, 1890s?
date:- 1890=1899
period:- 19th century, late

old map:- Prior 1874 map 1

Map, Winander Mere, scale about 2.5 miles to 1 inch, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1874.
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Belle Isle
island

placename:- Belle Isle
date:- 1874
period:- 19th century, late; 1870s

old map:- Garnett 1850s-60s H

Map of the English Lakes, scale about 3.5 miles to 1 inch, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, 1850s-60s.
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Belle Isle
island

placename:- Belle Isle
date:- 1850=1869
period:- 19th century, late; 1850s; 1860s

descriptive text:- Ford 1839 (3rd edn 1843) -- perhaps relevant

Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, et al, 1839; published 1839-52.
Page 23:-
... Down the lake, the eye rests upon the Monarch Isle, lying amid its dependents - the Ferry House and Station on the west - Bowness on the east, ...

other name:- Monarch Isle
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

descriptive text:- Ford 1839 (3rd edn 1843)

Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, et al, 1839; published 1839-52.
Page 26:-
...
Of the numerous islands that crowd the narrow part of the Mere [Windermere], we shall only mention two: ... and Curwen's Island, or Belle Isle, a very sequestered spot, belonging to H. C. Curwen, Esq. of Workington Hall. It contains about thirty-six acres, is nearly two miles in circumference, and there is a gravel walk round its margin, on which strangers are allowed to walk. Its figure is oblong, the shores irregular, with tiny creeks and retiring bays, in which the weeping willow droops its elegant branches. Great variety of forest trees and other wood adorn the island - the massy Scotch fir, the noble chestnut, and the embowering plane, with ancient thorns aud (sic) yews. The house is of a circular form, and was built by Mr. English, a former proprietor of the island. ...

placename:- Curwen's Island
other name:- Belle Isle
person:- : Curwen, H C
person:- : English, Mr
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

descriptive text:- Ford 1839 (3rd edn 1843)

Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by William Ford, published by Charles Thurnham, London, et al, 1839; published 1839-52.
Page 23:-
... Down the lake, the eye rests upon the Monarch Isle, lying amid its dependents - the Ferry House and Station on the west - Bowness on the east, ...
Page 26:-
...
Of the numerous islands that crowd the narrow part of the Mere [Windermere], we shall only mention two: ... and Curwen's Island, or Belle Isle, a very sequestered spot, belonging to H. C. Curwen, Esq. of Workington Hall. It contains about thirty-six acres, is nearly two miles in circumference, and there is a gravel walk round its margin, on which strangers are allowed to walk. Its figure is oblong, the shores irregular, with tiny creeks and retiring bays, in which the weeping willow droops its elegant branches. Great variety of forest trees and other wood adorn the island - the massy Scotch fir, the noble chestnut, and the embowering plane, with ancient thorns aud (sic) yews. The house is of a circular form, and was built by Mr. English, a former proprietor of the island. ...

placename:- Curwen's Island
other name:- Belle Isle
person:- : Curwen, H C
person:- : English, Mr
date:- 1839
period:- 19th century, early; 1830s

descriptive text:- Otley 1823 (5th edn 1834)

Guidebook, Concise Description of the English Lakes, later A Description of the English Lakes, by Jonathan Otley, published by the author, Keswick, Cumberland, by J Richardson, London, and by Arthur Foster, Kirky Lonsdale, Cumbria, 1823 onwards.
image OT01P003, button   goto source.
Page 3:-
... The numerous islands, with which it [Windermere] is enriched, are chiefly grouped near the middle of the lake; so as to admit greater scope for the exercise of sailing. The principal, called Belle-Isle - from the late Mrs. Curwen who purchased it into the family - is a beautiful plot of thirty acres, surmounted by a stately mansion, and encircled by a gravel walk of nearly two miles, which strangers are freely permitted to perambulate. ...

placename:- Belle Isle
person:- : Curwen, Mrs
date:- 1823
period:- 19th century, early; 1820s

source:- Otley 1818

New Map of the District of the Lakes, in Westmorland, Cumberland, and Lancashire, scale about 4 miles to 1 inch, by Jonathan Otley, engraved by J and G Menzies, Edinburgh, Lothian, Scotland, published by J Otley, Keswick, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1818; pblished 1818 to 1850s.
image OT02SD39, button   goto source.
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island

old map:- Housman 1800 map 4

Map, Lakes in Lancashire and Westmoreland, engraved by McIintyre, Edinburgh, published by F Jollie, Carlisle, Cumberland, 1800.
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Curwins Island

placename:- Curwins Island
date:- 1800
period:- 19th century, early; 1800s

road book:- Cary 1798 (2nd edn 1802)

Road book, Cary's New Itinerary, by John Cary, published by G and J Cary, 86 St James's Street, London, 1798-1828.
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page 317-318
Opposite Bowness, on Winander Mere is Belle Isle, John Christian Curwen, Esq.

placename:- Belle Isle
person:- : Curwen, John Christian
date:- 1802
period:- 19th century, early; 1800s

old text:- Camden 1789 (Gough Additions)

Britannia, or A Chorographical Description of the Flourishing Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by William Camden, 1586, translated from the 1607 Latin edition by Richard Gough, published London, 1789.
Page 144:-
... The holm or island in it [Windermere lake] reckoned to Westmorland contains above 30 acres, and has a good house on it, where sir Christopher Philipson lived 1705 secreted from creditors. Mr. English began a house there which was finished by Miss Curwen, since married to John Christian, esq. ...
person:- : Philipson, Christopher, Sir
person:- : English, Mr
person:- : Curwen, Miss
date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old text:- Camden 1789 (Gough Additions)

Britannia, or A Chorographical Description of the Flourishing Kingdoms of England, Scotland, and Ireland, by William Camden, 1586, translated from the 1607 Latin edition by Richard Gough, published London, 1789.
Page 154:-
...
In this lake are several islands; the largest of which is now called Long-holme, but antiently it was called Wynandermere island.
Among the escheats in 21 Edward III. there is an order, that the wood in the island of Wynandermere called Brendwood (that is fire-wood, from the Saxon brennan, to burn), shall not be several but common to all the free tenants of Kirkby in Kendale, and of Strikland, Crosthwaite, Croke, and others, as well to depasture with all their cattle, as to take house-bote and key-bote at their will without the view of the foresters.
Unto whom this island was first granted in fee by the crown we have not found. It belonged in after-times to the Philipsons of Crooke; and was sold by Frances daughter and sole heir of sir Christopher Philipson, son of Huddleston Philipson, to Mr. Thomas Brathwaite of Crooke, who sold the same to one Mr. Floyer, who sold to Mr. Thomas Barlow, whose brother and heir Mr. Robert Barlow sold the same to Thomas English, esq.
This island contains about 30 acres of ground, most of it arable; and had an handsome neat house in the middle of it called the Holme-house; which in the civil wars was besieged by colonel Briggs for eight or ten days, until, the seige of Carlisle being raised, Mr. Huddleston Philipson of Crooke, to whom it belonged, hastened from Carlisle, and relieved his brother Robert in Holme-house. The next day being Sunday Mr. Robert Philipson, with three or four more, rode to Kendal to take revenge of some of the adverse party there, passed the watch, and rode into the church up one aile and down another, in expectation to find one particular person there whom they were very desirous to have met with. Our author, Mr. Machel, who was a royalist, out of delicacy, did not chuse to name him as he was then living, but probably it was colonel Briggs. But, not finding him, Robert was unhorsed by the guards in his return, and his girths broken; but his companions relieved him by a desperate charge; and, clapping his saddle on without any girth, he vaulted into the saddle, killed a centinel, and galloped away, and returned to the island by two of the clock. Upon the occasion of this and other like adventures he obtained the appellation of Robin the devil. He was killed at last in the Irish wars at the battle of Washford.
Upon this island there is a remarkable echo; and, for hearing the same in perfection, Mr. Barlow provided two small cannon; on the explosion whereof towards the rock on the west side of the water, there is first a burst of the sound upon the rock, exactly similar to the first explosion by lightning, then, after an intermission of about three seconds, a sudden rattling of thunder to the left. And after another intermission, when one imagines all to be over, a sudden rumbling to the right, which passes along the rock, and dies away not distinguishable from distant thunder.

placename:- Long Holme
other name:- Wynandermere Island
person:- : Philipson Family
person:- : Philipson, Christopheer, Sir
person:- : Philipson, Robert
person:- : Brathwaite, Thomas
person:- : Floyer, Mr
person:- : Barlow, Thomas
person:- : English, Thomas
date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old text:- Clarke 1787

Guide book, A Survey of the Lakes of Cumberland, Westmorland, and Lancashire, by James Clarke, Penrith, Cumberland, and in London etc, 1787 and 1789; and Plans of the Lakes ... 1793.
Page 138:-
...
... a part of the Lake resembling the Archipelago, to the great island, and there land. This island belongs to John Christian, Esq; member of parliament for the city of Carlisle, who had it with his wife, a miss Curwen of Workington-Hall ...
... Mrs Christian ... purchased the island of Mr English, who had bought it of a Mr Barlow, and laid out a considerable sum of money on the house and gardens. These, however, Mr Hutchinson found great fault with in his Guide to the Lakes, published in 1770. I shall give his own words, and let the reader judge himself:- "The few natural beauties of this island are wounded and distorted by some ugly rows of firs set in right lines, and by the works now carrying on by Mr English the proprietor; who is laying out gardens on a square plan, building fruit-walls, and planning to erect a mansion-house there. The want of taste is a misfortune too often attending the opulent, (a pretty compliment paid to the opulent!) The romantic seite of this place, on so noble a lake, and surrounded with such scenes, asked for the plan of an edifice and pleasure grounds: But instead of that, to see a Dutch burgomaster's palace arise on this place; to see a cabbage-garth extend its bosom to the East, squared and cut out at right angles, is so offensive to the eye of the traveller, that he turns away with disgust. For pleasure, or for ornament, a narrow footpath is cut round the margin of the island, and laid with white sand; resembling the dusty paths of foot passengers over Stepney fields, or the way along which the owner often has heyed to Hackney."
Mr West says, "Of this sequestered spot Mr Young speaks in rapture; and Mr Pennant has done it much honour by his description: But, alas! it is no more to be seen in that beautiful unaffected state in which those gentlemen saw it. The sweet secreted
person:- : Christian, John
person:- : Curwen, Miss
person:- : English, Mr
person:- : Barlow, Mr
date:- 1787
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old map:- Clarke 1787 map (Windermere N)

Map series, lakes and roads to the Lakes, by James Clarke, engraved by S J Neele, 352 Strand, London, included in A Survey of the Lakes of Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire, published by James Clarke, Penrith, and in London etc, from 1787 to 1793.
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J. CHRISTIAN Esqr.
Various buildings, and perhaps a boat house, are shown.
island
person:- : Christian, J
date:- 1787
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old text:- Gilpin 1786

Guide book, Observations, Relative Chiefly to Picturesque Beauty, Made in the Year 1772, on Several Parts of England, Particularly the Mountains, and Lakes of Cumberland Westmoreland, by Rev William Gilpin, 1772-74; published 1786-1808.
vol.1 p.135
... we embarked [from Bowness], and standing out to sea; made for the great island; which we were informed was a very interesting scene.
We soon arrived at it; and landing at the south end, we ordered our boat to meet us at the north point; meaning to traverse it's little boundaries.
A more sequestered spot cannot easily be conceived. Nothing can be more excluded from the noise, and interruption of life; or abound with a greater variety of those circumstances, which make retirement pleasing.
The whole island contains about thirty acres. It's form is oblong; it's shores irregular; retiring into bays, and broken into creeks.
vol.1 p.136
The surface too is uneven; and a sort of little Appenine ridge runs through the middle of it; falling down, in all shapes into the water.- Like it's great mother-island, the southern part wears a smoother aspect, than the northern, which is broken, and rocky.
Formerly the whole island was one entire grove. At present, it is rather bare of wood; though there are some large oaks upon it.
One of it's greatest beauties arises from that irregular little Appenine, just mentioned, which extends from one end to the other. This circumstance hides it's insularity, by connecting it with the continent. In every part, except on the high grounds, you stand in an amphitheatre composed of the noblest objects; and the lake performing the office of a sunk fence, the grandeur of each part of the continent is called in, by turns, to aid the insignificance of the island.
The oblong form also of the lake gives the island another great advantage. On both it's sides, the opposite shore of the continent is little more than half a mile distant: but at the northern and southern points there is a large sheet of water. The views therefore, as you walk round, are continually changing
vol.1 p.137
through all the varieties of distance; which are still farther improved by a little degree of obliquity, in the position of the island.
He who should take upon him to ornament such a scene as this, would have only to conduct his walk and plantations, so as to take advantage of the grand parts of the continent around him;- to hide what is offensive - and, amidst a choice of great and picturesque scenes, to avoid shewing too much. As he would have, at all times, an exuberance of water, he should not be ostentatious in displaying it. It would be a relief to the eye sometimes to exclude it wholly; and to introduce a more sylvan scene, with distant mountains rising above it. A transient glance of the water, with some well-chosen objects beyond it, would often also have a good effect; and sometimes a grand expansion of the whole.- Thus the objects around, tho unmanageable in themselves, might be brought under command by the assistance of an insular situation.
With regard to the ornamenting of such a scene, an elegant neatness is all the improver
vol.1 p.138
should aim at. Amidst these grand objects of nature, it would be absurd to catch the eye with the affected decorations of art. The simple idea he would desire to preserve, is, what the place itself suggests, a sequestered retreat. The boundaries should in a great measure be thicket - on the eastern coast especially, which is opposed to the only cultivated part of the country: and if there be any thing in that part worth giving to the eye, it might be given through some unaffected opening.
For thickets, the wild wood of the country would abundantly suffice. It grows luxuriantly, and would soon produce it's effect.
The middle parts of the island, with a few clumps properly disposed, might be neat pasturage, with flocks, and herds; which would contrast agreeably with the rough scenery around.
The house, at present, stands too formally in the middle of the island. It might stand better near the southern promontory. The air of this sweet retreat is said to be very pure. *
[*] Since this view of Windermere island was taken, it hath been under the hands of improvement. The proprietor, I have been told, spent six thousand pounds upon it; with which sum he contrived to do almost every thing, that one should wish had been left undone. It is now in other hands, which may probably restore it's beauty.
date:- 1786
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s

old map:- West 1784 map

A Map of the Lakes in Cumberland, Westmorland and Lancashire, now Cumbria, scale about 3.5 miles to 1 inch, engraved by Paas, 53 Holborn, London, included in the Guide to the Lakes by Thomas West, published by William Pennington, Kendal, Westmorland, and in London, from the 3rd edition 1784, to 1821.
In Windermere Water.
image Ws02SD39, button   goto source.
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island
county:- Westmorland

old map:- Crosthwaite 1783-94 (Win/Ble)

Series of maps, An Accurate Map of the Matchless Lake of Derwent, of the Grand Lake of Windermere, of the Beautiful Lake of Ullswater, of Broadwater or Bassenthwaite Lake, of Coniston Lake, of Buttermere, Crummock and Loweswater Lakes, and Pocklington's Island, by Peter Crosthwaite, Kendal, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1783 to 1794.
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Windermere Island House. / John Christian Curwen Esqr.

placename:- Windermere Island House
person:- : Curwen, John Christian
date:- 1783=1794
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s; 1790s

old map:- Crosthwaite 1783-94 (Win/Ble)

Series of maps, An Accurate Map of the Matchless Lake of Derwent, of the Grand Lake of Windermere, of the Beautiful Lake of Ullswater, of Broadwater or Bassenthwaite Lake, of Coniston Lake, of Buttermere, Crummock and Loweswater Lakes, and Pocklington's Island, by Peter Crosthwaite, Kendal, Cumberland now Cumbria, 1783 to 1794.
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Bella Island / Jno. C. Curwen's Esqr.
text panel:-
..., His [Thomas West's] 2d. Station is the South Side of Bella Island. His 3d. the North Side of do. ... ...

placename:- Bella Island
person:- : Curwen, John Christian
date:- 1783=1794
period:- 18th century, late; 1780s; 1790s

descriptive text:- West 1778 (11th edn 1821)

Guide book, A Guide to the Lakes, by Thomas West, published by William Pennington, Kendal, Cumbria once Westmorland, and in London, 1778 to 1821.
image WS21P058, button   goto source.
Page 58:-
[Windermere] ... spotted with islands. Amongst them, the Holme, or Great Island, an oblong tract of thirty acres, traverses the lake in an oblique line, surrounded by a number of inferior isles, finely formed and dressed in wood. ...
...
image WS21P060, button   goto source.
Page 60:-
... [from Harrow Farm] The island, from this stand, appears with much variety of shore; indented and embayed; almost surrounded with islets; adorned with ancient oaks and scattered trees [1]. ... A sweeter picture than this, the lake does not [furnish]
[1] In the collection of Views of the Lakes, engraved by Messrs. Byrne &c. Mr. Farrington's view from the hill above the ferry-house, represents this scene.
...
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Page 61:-
... Great Island, ...
The island was long the property of the Philipsons, once a family of consequence in these parts [1].
[1] This island is now the property of Mr. Curwen, who finished the large mansion-house begun by Mr. English, laid the whole out in pleasure-grounds, in the modern style, suitable to the place, and made it one of the sweetest places that can be imagined.

placename:- Holme Island
other name:- Great Island
person:- : Philipson Family
person:- : English, Mr
person:- : Curwen, Mr
date:- 1778
period:- 18th century, late; 1770s

old map:- Jefferys 1770 (Wmd)

Map, The County of Westmoreland, scale about 1 inch to 1 mile, surveyed by J Ainslie and perhaps T Donald, engraved and published by Thomas Jefferys, London, 1770.
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G. Island
island

placename:- Great Island
county:- Westmorland
date:- 1770
period:- 18th century, late; 1770s

old map:- Simpson 1746 map (Wmd) -- probably relevant

Maps, Westmorland, scale about 8 miles to 1 inch, and Cumberland? in The Agreeable Historian by Samuel Simpson, printed by R Walker, Fleet Lane, London, 1746.
image SMP2SDJ, button   goto source.
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Island in Windermere.
county:- Westmorland
date:- 1746
period:- 18th century, early; 1740s

descriptive text:- Fiennes 1698

Travel book, manuscript record of Journeys through England including parts of the Lake District, by Celia Fiennes, 1698.
... it [Windermere] has many little hills or isles in it, one of a great bigness is 30 acres of ground on which is a house, the Gentleman that is Lord of the Manour lives in it Sir Christopher Phillips; he has a great command of the water, and of the villages thereabout and many privileges, he makes a Major or Bailiff of the place during life; its but a small mean place, ... the Isle did not looke to be so bigg at the shore but takeing boate I went on it and found it as large and very good barley and oates and grass; ...
person:- : Philipson, Christopher, Sir
date:- 1698
period:- 17th century, late
period:- 1690s

database:- Listed Buildings 2010

Listed Buildings 2010

courtesy of English Heritage
BELLE ISLE / / / WINDERMERE TOWN / SOUTH LAKELAND / CUMBRIA / I / 351655 / SD3928496478
courtesy of English Heritage
Built 1774, designed by John Plaw, it was the first house in the Lake District to be built for picturesque reasons. Unique in having a circular plan. Crowned by a dome with a lantern. Ionic entrance portico of 4 unfluted columns, and Venetian windows in the other cardinal sides. The basement is square, with 3 storeys and attics above in a cylinder. The island was landscaped by Thomas White in the 1780's. See Country Life article.

placename:- Belle Isle
district:- South Lakeland
listed building
coordinates:- SD39289647
date:- 2010
period:- 2010s

old print:- Martineau 1855

Guide book, A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855; published 1855-71.
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Print, engraving, Windermere from near Storrs, drawn by L Aspland, engraved by W Banks, Edinburgh, published by John Garnett, Windermere, Westmorland, and by Whittaker and Co, London, 1855.
Opposite p.13 in A Complete Guide to the English Lakes, by Harriet Martineau.
printed at bottom left, right, centre:-
L Aspland Delt. / W Banks Sc Edinr. / WINDERMERE / from near Storrs.
date:- 1855
period:- 19th century, late

descriptive text:- Farington 1789 (plate 17)

20 engravings, Views of the Lakes in Cumberland and Westmorland, drawn by Joseph Farington, published by William Byrne, London, 1789.
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Print, engraving, West view across Windermere from the Hill above Ferry House, Cumbria, painted by Joseph Farington, engraved by W Byrne and J Landseer, published by W Byrne, 69 Titchfield Street, London, 1785.
The lake with a fine background of mountains, Belle Isle clear; a group of travellers in the foreground.
Plate 17 from Views of the Lakes, &c, in Cumberland and Westmorland, published 1789; with descriptive text:-
VIEW across WINDERMERE, looking over the GREAT ISLAND.
... The Islands on Windermere (if they may be so called, many of them being rather wooded Rocks), are ten in number, composing a Kind of Archipelago, and in some Views appearing to separate the upper from the lower Reach of the Lake. In this View, which was taken on the Western Side, nearly opposite the Village of Bowness, the Great-Island, which contains about thirty Acres, forms a principal Object. It is of an oblong Shape, traversing the Lake in an oblique Line, and is the only one on which a Building is erected. ...

placename:- Great Island
date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late

descriptive text:- Farington 1789 (plate 14)

20 engravings, Views of the Lakes in Cumberland and Westmorland, drawn by Joseph Farington, published by William Byrne, London, 1789.
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Print, engraving, View of Windermere from Gill Head, Cumbria, painted by Joseph Farington, engraved by T Medland, published by W Byrne, 69 Titchfield Street, London, 1788.
View down the lake, Belle Isle clear in the distance. Plate 14 from Views of the Lakes, &c, in Cumberland and Westmorland, published 1789; with descriptive text:-
VIEW of WINDERMERE from GILL-HEAD. ... the Lake is divided into two Parts by a Cluster of Islands, one of which, being much larger than the rest is usually called the Great-Island. ...
date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late

descriptive text:- Farington 1789 (plate 19)

20 engravings, Views of the Lakes in Cumberland and Westmorland, drawn by Joseph Farington, published by William Byrne, London, 1789.
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Print, engraving, View looking down Windermere, taken above Rarig ie Rayrigg, Lakes, Cumbria, painted by Joseph Farington, engraved by W Byrne and T Medland, published by W Byrne, 69 Titchfield Street, London, 1789.
A farmer on horseback drives cattle up Rayrigg Bank in the foreground, Belle Isle is clear in the lake.
Plate 19 from Views of the Lakes, &c, in Cumberland and Westmorland, published 1789; with descriptive text:-
VIEW looking down WINDERMERE from above RARIG. ...
date:- 1789
period:- 18th century, late

old print:- Green 1809

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Print, soft ground etching, Islands of Windermere, Westmorland, by William Green, published by William Green, Ambleside, Westmorland, and Longman, Hurst, Rees and Orme, Paternoster Row, London, 1809.
Plate 49 in Seventy Eight Studies from Nature.
printed in introductory pages to set of prints:-
Number 49. Curwen Island, the property of John Christian Curwen, Esq. and the largest Island on Windermere, apparently uniting with the promontories, seems to cut the lake in two; ... This view is from the Fellside, above Beech Hill.
printed at bottom:-
THE ISLANDS OF WINDERMERE. / Published Ambleside, Augst. 1st. 1809, by W. Green.

placename:- Curwen Island
person:- : Curwen, John Christian
date:- 1809
period:- 19th century, early

old print:-
thumbnail PR0289, button to large image
Print, uncoloured engraving, Winandermere, Westmorland, published 1815.
printed at bottom:-
Winandermere
date:- 1815
period:- 19th century, early

story A royalist, Robert Philipson, known as Robin the Devil, lived on the island. He was besieged here during the Civil War by Parliamentary Forces commanded by Colonel Briggs, the seige broken after eight days by Robert's brother Colonel Huddlestone Philipson. In revenge the brothers tried to kidnap Colonel Briggs while at prayer in Holy Trinity Church, Kendal. They were chased off by the congregation, Robert loosing his sword and helmet, which are displayed in the church.
The round house was built by John Plaw for Thomas English, just begun 1774; the local population thought it a nonsense and Thomas English lost heart in the project. In 1781, the island, then called Longholm, was purcased by the trustees of Isabella Curwen and it became known as Bella's Isle.
It is said that Fletcher Christian lived on the island in the 1780s.
The house is sometimes referred to as the Tea Caddy.

hearsay Referred to as Long Island by Arthur Ransome.

button   boat house, Belle Isle
button   boat house, Belle Isle (2)
button   station, Belle Isle N
button   station, Belle Isle S

Old Cumbria Gazetteer - JandMN: 2013

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