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viewpoint, Hornby Road
county:-   Lancashire
locality type:-   viewpoint
coordinates:-   SD519646 (?) 
1Km square:-   SD5164
10Km square:-   SD56

evidence:-   descriptive text:- West 1778 (11th edn 1821) 
source data:-   Guide book, A Guide to the Lakes, by Thomas West, published by William Pennington, Kendal, Cumbria once Westmorland, and in London, 1778 to 1821.
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Page 6:-  "The late Mr. Gray was a great judge of landscapes; yet whoever makes choice of his station at the three mile stone from Lancaster, on the Hornby road, will fail in taking one of the finest afternoon rural views in England. The station he points out is a quarter of a mile too low and somewhat too much to the left. The more advantageous station, as I apprehend, is on the south side of the great, or Queen's road, a little higher than where Mr. Gray stood; for there the vale is in full display, including a long reach of the river and the wheel of Lune, forming a high crowned isthmus, fringed with tall trees, that in time past was the solitary site of a hermit [1]. A few"
"[1] Hugh, to whom William de Lancastre, sixth baron of Kendal, gave a certain place called Askeleros and Croc, to look to his fishing in the river Loyn [or Lune.] - Burn's Westmorland, p.31"
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"trees preserved on purpose by the owner, conceal the nakedness of Caton-Moor on the right, and render the view complete."
"..."
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Page 25:-  "Before you leave Lancaster, take a ride to the three mile-stone on the road to Hornby, and there have Mr. Gray's noble view of the vale of Lonsdale, which he or his editor, describes in these words, in the note page 373 of his life:- 'This scene opens just three miles from Lancaster, on what is called the Queen's road. To see this view in perfection you must go into a field on the left [1]. Here, Ingleborough, behind a variety of lesser mountains, makes the background of the prospect; on each hand of the middle distance rise two sloping hills, the left clothed with thick wood, the right with variegated rock"
"[1] As several mistakes have been made respecting this station, it is necessary to point it out more precisely. About a quarter of a mile beyond the third milestone, where the road makes a turn to the right, there is a gate on the left, which leads into a field, where the station meant will be found."
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Page 26:-  "and herbage. Between them, is the richest of valleys, the Lune serpentizes for many a mile, and comes forth ample and clear thro' a well wooded and richly pastured foreground. Every feature which constitutes a perfect landscape of the extensive sort, is here not only boldly marked, but also in its best position.'"
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Addendum; Mr Gray's Journal, 1769 
Page 218:-  "..."
"Oct. 12. I set out for Settle by a fine turnpike-road, ... In the most picturesque part of the way, I passed the part belonging to the Hon. Mr. Clifford, a catholic. The grounds between him and the river, are indeed charming [1]; ..."
"[1] This scene opens just three miles from Lancaster, on what is called the Queen's road. To see the view in perfection, you must go into a field on the left. Here Ingleborough, behind a variety of lesser mountains, makes the back-ground of the pro┬žon each hand of the middle distance, rise two sloping hills; the left clothed with thick woods - the right with variegated rock and herbage; between them, in the richest of valleys, the Lune serpentizes for many a mile, and comes forth ample and clear, through a well wooded and richly pastured fore-ground. Every feature which constitutes a perfect landscape of the extensive sort, is here not only boldly marked, but also in its best position."

evidence:-   descriptive text:- Baker 1802
source data:-   Perspective road map with sections in Lancashire, Westmorland, and Cumberland, by J Baker, London 1802.
pp.25-26:-  "... By a short deviation here from the great road [Lancaster to Kendal], into that which from it to Hornby, may be obtained a view of the rich luxuriant valley of the Lune, which Mr. Grey describes as possessing every feature which constitutes a perfect landscape. ..."

evidence:-   descriptive text:- Ford 1839 (3rd edn 1843) 
source data:-   Guide book, A Description of Scenery in the Lake District, by Rev William Ford, published by Charles Thurnam, Carlisle, by W Edwards, 12 Ave Maria Lane, Charles Tilt, Fleet Street, William Smith, 113 Fleet Street, London, by Currie and Bowman, Newcastle, by Bancks and Co, Manchester, by Oliver and Boyd, Edinburgh, and by Sinclair, Dumfries, 1839.
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Page 154:-  ".."
"Caton.- Between this village and Lancaster there is a grand view, from a field by the side of the road, of the fertile vale of Lune, with the Yorkshire mountains towering high over it."

indexing
person:-   author
 : West, Thomas
date:-   1778
period:-   18th century, late
period:-   1780s
item:-   guide bookGuide to the Lakes

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